June 22, 2019 at 06:03AM by CWC

Even though some of the exercises I perform during my workouts aren’t as coordinated as I’d like them to be (every lunge ever?), I do my best. At this point, I’ve pretty much just accepted that all the years of dance training I had in my youth didn’t stick with me into my adult years. But maybe putting a little more focus on coordination could be beneficial in more ways than one.

Coordination is what helps you move efficiently throughout your life, whether you’re exercising or going about your daily routine, says Nike master trainer Joe Holder.

“Coordination is an under-appreciated component of training,” he writes on Instagram. “The more coordinated an individual, you often notice a correlation with aesthetics naturally following as the body seems to be in tune with itself a bit more. It doesn’t always have to be overly complicated and nonsensical, but setting up environments where the athlete has to learn and control themselves often goes a long way.”

That’s exactly why he has many of his clients try different exercises with a coordination component. Working on coordination in your own life will help you get more out of your workouts as well.

 

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3 full-body coordination exercises a master trainer swears by

1. Rear foot elevated split squat variation

  1. Start in a split squat position with your back foot on an elevated surface and a kettlebell or dumbbell in each hand.
  2. Slowly lower into a squat, release the kettlebells on the floor, pause, jump straight up into the air, and land back into your squat position. Pause for a second.
  3. Slowly lift back up into your starting position, pause, and repeat.

2. Keiser cable lunge circuit

  1. Start with your feet shoulder-width apart with your knees bent, chest up, and butt slightly out. Hold a Keiser cable in both hands close to your body, or go without if one isn’t available.
  2. Lower into a reverse lunge on your right foot and return to your starting position.
  3. Step out to your left into a side lunge, return to your starting position, then extend your arms straight straight out in front of you before bringing them back to your chest. Repeat on the other side.

3. Lateral prowler marches

  1. Pulling a prowler sled with one hand, smoothly march sideways, bringing your knees up to hip-height.
  2. Perform 10 marches on each leg, or go the span of the sled strip at your gym. Repeat on the other side.

Changing the position of your feet can make a huge difference. Also, try this 6-minute, no-equipment upper body workout you can do right at home.

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Author Tehrene Firman | Well and Good
Selected by CWC

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