September 09, 2019 at 04:07PM by CWC

Every once in a while, a skin-care product comes along that completely changes the game. As of late, that product has been Augustinus Bader Cream ($265), a namesake moisturizer created by German professor Augustinus Bader, who reinterpreted his medical-grade, wound-healing hydrogel into a skin-care product for the masses…or at least for those willing to shell out upwards of two hundred bucks.

At its advent, the hydrogel was created to help with burns and scarring; according to him, it greatly reduced the need for skin grafts and other scar revision therapies amongst patients. However, upon seeing how effective it was, Bader decided to use the cream to help with the skin’s four-week regeneration cycle.

“It’s not about adding stem cells to the body or cultivating cells outside the body—it’s a totally innovative approach that works with the body’s own physiological communication systems to trigger healing for sustainable health and wellbeing,” explains Bader. Essentially, it stimulates your body to create its own new cells by giving it the building blocks of amino acids, vitamins, and nutrients in “the right location at the right time.”

In addition to helping with scars, the technology can also be applied to other skin concerns, too, including acne and fine lines. “The formula was reported by clients to normalize oil secretion, while working to improve the appearance of dark spots that often remain after a breakout,” says Bader. “The creams were also reported to help to minimize the appearance of fine lines and restore the feeling of elasticity and a plump look and feel leaving skin feeling renewed, rejuvenated and glowing with health.”

There are actually two options to choose from: the original, that’s meant to provide a “weightless layer” to hydrate and smooth skin, and The Rich Cream ($265), which is a thicker, creamier option that’s laced with argan, avocado and evening primrose oils for extra dry complexions.

How does it work?

I’ll save you the long story, but I wound up with a scar on my cheek earlier this year, and so to really put the formula to good use, I decided to exclusively test it on and around my scar. Bader suggests using it on clean, dry, skin—without any other products underneath it—for best results, so that’s exactly what I did. “Augustinus Bader skin care isn’t formulated to be applied to an open wound—it’s used on closed skin,” the inventor explains. “It can help accelerate the healing and diminishing of scars.”

The question you’ve been wondering: Does it work? Yep. I’ve been using the cream on my scar (and my scar alone to save the precious formula) every morning and night for exactly a month, and the healing process has been truly incredible to watch. While there’s still a tiny mark on my face, it’s less than a third of the size it was, and it looks like a teeny, tiny dimple compared to what it looked like. I’ve limited the other products that I put on the scar, and have only supplemented the cream with a few at-home LED light treatments using an Eterno LED Device ($299).

There have been a few times when I couldn’t help but slather my whole face in a coat of the rich cream, and it’s truly as good as everyone says it is. It keeps my skin moisturized all day long without the assistance of a bunch of other products, which is a truly impressive feat.

If you’re dealing with acne scarring and don’t want to drop $265 on a cream, here are some other ways to deal, straight from derms. Plus, our favorite moisturizers with SPF in them now that the sun is officially out for spring. 

Continue Reading…

Author Zoe Weiner | Well and Good
Selected by CWC

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